Travel Guide South America

South America is big so we will try and make a post or two about each country. How much it cost to travel there and maybe a bit more.

Expenses in Brazil (60 days of travel in a van)

We travelled in Brazil from the 26th of April 2018 to the 24th of June 2018 (in total 60 days). Every penny we have spend together or for personal use are included. We are aware that we might have forgotten to add few expenses during our travel – nobody is perfect. Our budget is 66 USD per day including everything. In total we spend 5,680.36 USD in Brazil, which calculates into 94.40 USD per day. This means that we overspend with 28.4 USD per day, so in total we exceeded our budget with 1704 USD during the 60 days that we traveled in Brazil (spending 43% more than planned). We visited the Iguazu falls first on the Brazilian side, then we drove across the border into Argentina on the 22nd, and visited Iguazu falls from the Argentinian side. So included in our budget for Brazil is 2,5 day, that we spend in Argentina visiting the Iguazu falls before we drove to Paraguay. We use an app called TOSHL FINANCE (https://toshl.com), which we could customize to our travel expenses. We decided to buy TOSHL PRO for 19.99 USD (https://toshl.com/pricing/) which gives us access to an online account where all the pictures are from.   To save money we have tried to follow these basic rules (7. edition for Brazil) Wild (free) camp as much as possible. This is one of the most efficient ways of saving money, when you don’t have to pay for camping, hostels or hotels. Using www.ioverlander.com to find places, where we could camp for free. This time we used Airbnb.com, when we planned our visit to Rio de Janeiro (but had to cancel because of the trucker strike, because of no gasoline and lost some money), because we don’t like to wild camp in a big city. A lot of places on Airbnb have discounts if you stay 7 nights or more, so remember to check that out. Stay with other people for free. Wild camping in Brazil is more difficult, so staying with locals was a good alternative to wild camping. Brazilian Overlanders have a network on Facebook, which is a closed group called “Apoio as Pessoas que Viajam de Motorhome”. We got in contract with the network through a family in Brusque (they are on www.ioverlander.com). When we stay with other people for free, they sometimes offer, that we can do some laundry for free, we really appreciate this. This time we would like to thank our new family in Brusque and Sao Paulo. This is also possible by using www.couchsurfing.com, which we didn’t use in Brazil, mostly because couch-surfers are located in the bigger cities, which we didn’t visit. Cook our own food. It is way cheaper to cook your own food in Brazil. In the van we have a 12 volt cooler, which we use to keep fresh produce, meat, cheese, milk etc. this makes it so much easier to cook our own fresh food. The cheapest place to go and buy fresh fruit, vegetables, meat, cheese and eggs is at the small stands next to the road, because it is cheaper than buying it in the supermarkets. Unfortunately we didn’t visit the local markets (Mercado) in Brazils. We go for the cheaper cuts of meat or chicken, depending of what we feel like. Meat is cheap in Brazil, so we ate more meat. Don’t buy imported groceries they are expensive, Nutella is a very good example. Canned food are still more expensive (corn and peas come in foil packages, which are cheaper), than fresh food, so whenever you can cook you own meals from fresh produce, you can save money. When you buy a snack, just buy one and share (do you really need one each?), you never know if it is good, and you can always buy another one after the first one. Eating out in Brazil is about 5 USD per person per plate, at one of the “self-service” restaurants. It works like this, you pay for the plate and fill it up at the buffet once. Activities: pick the ones which are the most important for you. We try to explore areas by hiking, which doesn’t cost anything but here in Brazil, but a lot of places you have to have a local guide, which is not always cheap (not if you compare it to hiking for free). We did do some free hiking on Isla Santa Catarina, but as soon as we got to the National Parks, it was mandatory to have a guide. What made it even more complicated was, that it was almost impossible for us to pre-book and plan head, because we had trouble finding contact information for the guides. Our conclusion is that activities are expensive in Brazil, because there is only few things you can do for free. Categories for the expenses Overview of how we have spend the 5,680.36 USD in Brazil (94.40 USD per day). We have used the same categories for Brazil as for Chile and Argentina traveling in our van. Our expenses have been allocated into 12 categories. We to drive long distances in Brazil, but in total our expenses for transport was only 19 %. We only spend 16 USD per day on food and drink, that is cheap. Our top post is activities (1648.53 USD), this includes 3 scuba diving trips of 743.70 USD in total. Again I was running out of medicine, and bought medicine for the next 6 months, which will last until we get back home, in total: 501.57 USD. New hiking boots for Esben 305 USD (Clothing & footwear). Replacement of equipment (things wear out and you pictures add up): new bladder, new charger for the camera, extra hard drive for pictures and two protection lenses for camera equipment, in total: 180.83 USD. In total the bold numbers add up to 1731.10 USD. Is was very easy to buy all my personal medicine over the counter in Brazil (I need prescriptions at home).

Expenses in Uruguay (8 days of travel in a van)

We travelled in Uruguay from the 18th-25th of April 2018. This is the second budget traveling in a van and only covers a very short time period, so bear that in mind. All our expenses are included in the overview. Every penny we have spend together or for personal use are included. We are aware that we might have forgotten to add few expenses during our travel – nobody is perfect. Our budget is 66 USD per day including everything.In total we spend 538.55 USD in Uruguay, which calculates into 67.32 per day. This means that we overspend with 1.32 USD per day, so in total we exceeded our budget with 10.56 USD during the 8 days that we traveled in Uruguay. We use an app called TOSHL FINANCE (https://toshl.com), which we could customize to our travel expenses. We decided to buy TOSHL PRO for 19.99 USD (https://toshl.com/pricing/) which gives us access to an online account where all the pictures are from.   To save money we have tried to follow these basic rules (6. edition for Uruguay, very similar to what we did in Chile and Argentina) Wild (free) camp as much as possible. This is one of the most efficient ways of saving money, when you don’t have to pay for camping, hostels or hotels. Using www.ioverlander.com to find places, where we could camp for free. Stay with other people for free. We have also made friends during our trip, and have been invited to stay at their place for free. In Montevideo we contacted an overlander living there, that invited us into his home. Thank you. When we stay with other people for free, they sometimes offer, that we can do some laundry for free, we really appreciate this. This is also possible by using www.couchsurfing.com, which we didn’t done in Uruguay. Cook our own food. It is way cheaper to cook your own food in Uruguay than eating out. When you buy a snack, just buy one and share (do you really need one each?), you never know if it is good, and you can always buy another one after the first one. Not much else to say. The smaller food stalls at the road selling fruit, vegetables, eggs and cheese are cheaper than buying everything in a supermarket. Activities: pick the ones which are the most important for you. We try to explore areas by hiking, which doesn’t cost anything. For example, we those to walk to Faro de Cabo Polonio (7 km each way) instead of paying for the tourist truck. Explore the towns and cities by walking around, and don’t spend money on expensive tours fx segway tours. Now we have one bicycle, and got to borrow a bicycle at the amazing overlander, that we visited in Montevideo, saving money not the rent a bicycle. Categories for the expensesOverview of how we have spend the 538.55 USD in Uruguay. We have used the same categories for Uruguay as for Chile and Argentina traveling in our van. Our expenses have been allocated into 8 categories, which primarily covers expenses for daily living. What springs to my mind is that we used 29.1 USD per day on food. Food is not cheap in Uruguay, and I (Camilla) also decided to stock up on oats and milk. It would have been way cheaper to wait until we had reached Brazil, but we didn’t know that. Gasoline is also more expensive in Uruguay compared to any other country in South America, which accounted for 25 % of all our expenses in Uruguay. To compare the fuel only accounted for 15 % of all our expenses in Chile and Argentina. Also getting cash from the ATM in Uruguay was more expensive, and the ATM didn’t notified us about the fee until it printed out the receipt. Overview of expenses in categories, when traveling 8 days in Uruguay, in average we used 67.32 per day All the categories have subcategories (called Tags), which makes it possible for us to get a more detailed overview of the expenses within the different categories (the darker grey area). In the top each picture you have the total amount of expenses in the category, and underneath you have the amount of expenses allocated into the subcategories.     In total we are satisfied of how we spend our money in Uruguay, though we would really have liked not to overspend, and we were so close to the budget. We bought a tarp to cover the bicycle, cooler fluid and injection cleaner at the cost of 66.58 USD. We really looked for tarp in Chile and Argentina, but was not able to find one until we got to Uruguay. The tarp, cooler fluid and injection cleaner is not a normal monthly expense, so if we had not bought it, we would have been under budget with 56.02. It is all about keeping track for your expenses so you don’t overspend and spend money on the things that are important to you. If you have any question about our budget, please feel free to ask.

Expenses in Chile and Argentina (148 days of travel in a van)

We travelled in Chile and Argentina from the 21th of November 2017 to the 17th of April 2018 (in total 148 days). This is the first budget traveling in a van, and does not include the 22 days we spend on selling our two motorcycles, buying the van (paying for the paperwork) and the repairs and improvements we did during those days. By not including the expenses during this time period, where we sold the motorcycles and bought the van, the budget gives a more realistic view of how much money we have spend living a life on the road in Chile and Argentina. We have decided to make one budget for Chile and Argentina (not two separate budget), since we kept crossing the borders between the two countries, and buying cheaper food in Chile to consume in Argentina. In total we spend 148 days travelling from Santiago, Chile to Ushuaia, Argentina then traveling north in Argentina until reaching Uruguay, about 15,000 km. All our expenses are included in the overview in this post except from the 314.44 USD, that we spend on Christmas gifts to family and friends in Denmark. Every penny we have spend together or for personal use are included. We are aware that we might have forgotten to add few expenses during our travel – nobody is perfect. Our budget is 66 USD per day including everything.In total we spend 10,536.53 USD in Chile and Argentina, which calculates into 71.19 per day. This means that we overspend with 5.19 USD per day, so in total we exceeded our budget with 768.12 USD during the 148 days that we traveled in Chile and Argentina. We use an app called TOSHL FINANCE (https://toshl.com), which we could customize to our travel expenses. We decided to buy TOSHL PRO for 19.99 USD (https://toshl.com/pricing/) which gives us access to an online account where all the pictures are from.    To save money we have tried to follow these basic rules (5. edition for Chile and Argentina) Wild (free) camp as much as possible. This is one of the most efficient ways of saving money, when you don’t have to pay for camping, hostels or hotels. Using www.ioverlander.com to find places, where we could camp for free. This time we used Airbnb.com when visiting Buenos Aires, because we don’t like to wild camp in a big city. We rented an apartment with two bedrooms including separate bathrooms, and shared the place with our friends Ryan and Camille, that way we split the expenses for the apartment. A lot of places on Airbnb have discounts if you stay 7 nights or more, so remember to check that out. Stay with other people for free. We have also made friends during our trip, and have been invited to stay at their place for free. In Los Angeles de Chile, we now have a new Chilean family, and in Ushuaia we now have a new Argentinian family. We love our new extra families, and it have given us so much getting us the opportunity to live with them. When we stay with other people for free, they sometimes offer, that we can do some laundry for free, we really appreciate this. This is also possible by using www.couchsurfing.com, which we didn’t done in Chile and Argentina, mostly because couch-surfers are located in the bigger cities, which we didn’t visit. Cook our own food. It is way cheaper to cook your own food in Chile and Argentina. Also groceries a cheaper in Chile compared to Argentina, so usually we would buy extra groceries in Chile and bring it to Argentina. Just remember that you are not allowed to bring any fresh procure etc. across the border between Chile and Argentina. We would bring extra of fx instant coffee, pasta, rise, soy protein milk powder, pesto, wine etc.  Don’t buy imported groceries they are expensive, Nutella is a very good example. Canned food are still more expensive, than fresh food, so whenever you can cook you own meals from fresh produce, you can save money. In the van we have a 12 volt cooler, which we use to keep fresh produce, meat, cheese, milk etc. this makes it so much easier to cook our own fresh food. The cheapest place the go and buy fresh fruit, vegetables, meat, cheese and eggs is at the local markets (Mercado) or at the small road stalls, and it is cheaper than buying it in the supermarkets. We go for the cheaper cuts of meat or chicken, depending of what we feel like. Meat is very cheap in Argentina, so we ate more meat. When you buy a snack, just buy one and share (do you really need one each?), you never know if it is good, and you can always buy another one after the first one. Activities: pick the ones which are the most important for you. We try to explore areas by hiking, which doesn’t cost anything. The entry fee to the national parks in Chile and Argentina are very different, but we love the national parks. We would especially recommend Los Glaciares National Park in El Chaltén, Argentina the entrance is free, good visitor center and amazing hiking trails. Explore the towns and cities by walking around, and don’t spend money on expensive tours fx segway tours. Categories for the expenses Overview of how we have spend the 10,536.53 USD in Chile and Argentina (71.19 USD per day). We have used the same categories for Chile and Argentina traveling in our van, as we used when traveling on the motorcycle. We have made one change, we added a new category called “Van” and don’t use the category “Motorcycle” anymore. Our expenses have been allocated into 12 categories. What springs to my mind is that we used 1,740.56 USD on the van (that is a lot of money), because we decided to buy an old van, we have had more repairs: 163.56 USD new battery for the van

Get inspired–how to eat right when hiking

Preparation of meals and snacks before a multiday hike is essential if you want to be able to enjoy the hike. We really focus on getting enough calories and protein in our main meals, so our bodies have more energy, and we fell better when hiking. Also we sleep better during the night, if we don’t wake up hungry in the middle of the night. An overview photo of the we had with us on the 4-day hike in Cerro Castillo Natural Reserve An overview photo of the we had with us on the 4/5-day hike "Sierra Valdivieso" In the left picture is 4 x lunch including 2 extra meals (only mashed potatoe in powder and polenta). In the right pictures is 3 x dinner.    In the left pictures you have the food, that we mixed into our own trail-mix: peanuts, roasted fava beans, raisins, corn nuts (inca corns) and chocolate cereal puff with nutella inside. For dessert we had packed chocolate crackes and a jar of peanut butter. In the right picture you have our breakfast.    We also have to take into account that Esben burns more calories than me (Camilla), because Esben weighs 20-25 kg more than me and is male, which means that he by nature burns more calories. We carry about the same amount of weight in our backpacks, because it equals our difference in physical fitness. We have met a lot of others hikers, where the man/guy carries a heavier backpack, which means that he will burn even more calories than the girls carrying less weight. So how to plan the meals so Esben gets more calories than me? Esbens breakfast is bigger Esbens trailsmix is bigger Esben gets to eat one Snickers chocolate bar per day (no Snickers for me) We share lunch and dinner, but I try to eat a little bit less than Esben (which can be difficult, when I am really hungry) The majority of food is dried, and has to be mixed with water. The multiday hikes we have done so far, water has been easy to find on our way. Remember that you body need around 1 gram of protein per kg of your bodyweight. When you are physical active the need for protein is higher, and when hiking it will be 1,2-1,4 grams per kg of your bodyweight. So the main meals should contain at least 30 grams of protein per person. Many times I have met other hikers that only eats food primarily is a source of fat and carbohydrates, because they need energy for the hike. First we have fat stored on our body. Second cabohydrates is stores in our liver and muscles, but has to be refueled everyday when you are physical active. Third our primarily storage of protein is our muscles, if you don't eat enought protein in your diet, your body will start eating of its muscles. This process will typically start on day one during the night, the process will continue if you don't eat protein. The more days you don't eat the sufficient amount of protein, the more musclemass you will loose. So the most important nutrients for your body during a hike is cabohydrates and protein. You can use food with a high content of fat to raises your daily intake of calories. This post is written with a background as a clinical dietician and a personal trainer for 10 years. This is what works really well for us, when we go hiking, but off course it can be done different. I just hope that you will get inspired. Also here in Patagonia it is almost impossible to buy ready freeze dried food fx Mountainhouse, and if you find it, it is really expensive. So this is also a cheaper solution.     We don’t carry a lot of spices but bullion and ketchup. Ketchup is always a life saver. We try to avoid canned food, because it is heavy, and the cans makes the amount of garbage bigger. Anyway our the hike in Cerro Castillo Natural reserve we had to cans of salmon, and on the Huemul trail we had one can of mackerel, because it is nice to something else than soy protein. Getting an overview of how many meals we have to bring for the two of us: 3*breakfast, 4*lunch and 3*dinner per person BREAKFAST The breakfast is prepared in portions in Ziploc bags before we go on the hike. I mix oats (one minute and old fashion), granola (we prefer chocolate flavor), nuts, milk powder (1 scoop), vanilla protein powder (1 scoop) and cinnamon or chocolate powder for  different flavor (then you don’t have to fill, that you are eating the same every morning). To add more carbs you can add dried fruit. Try to mix it all together in a bowl to evaluate the size of the breakfast, it should be bigger than, what you eat on a normal day with less physical activity. 1 scoop of milk powder and 1 scoop of protein powder raises the amount of protein to 30 grams, if you don´t add it, the protein content will be only 10 grams. Esben’s breakfast contains a bigger amount of oats, granola and nuts to make sure he gets enough calories for breakfast. We also carries tea, cacao powder mixed with some milk powder for hot chocolate and the instant coffee is mixed with some milk powder, because I like milk in my coffee. You just have to add water (not boiling!) int the ziplock bag, and your breakfast is ready.   Here is the recipe (1 scoop is 30 grams of protein powder): 1 scoop of milk powder, 1 scoop of protein powder, 1 (small or big) hand full of peanuts, 2 scoops of oats (old fashion style), 0-3 scoops of 1-minutes oats and 1,5-3 scoops of chocolate granola. I had 0 scoops of 1-minutes oats and 1,5 scoop of chocolate granola, and Esben had 2 scoops of 1-minute

Expenses in Ecuador, Peru and Chile (44 days of travel)

We travelled in Ecuador between 24th-28th of August and 21st of September and 29th of October 2017.This is the budget the time we traveled on the motorcycles, and does not include the 23 days we were on Galapagos. You can read more about all our expenses on Galapagos here: “Expenses in the Galapagos Islands (23 days of travel)”. In total we spend 44 days travelling on our two motorcycles riding from Ecuador through Peru to Santiago de Chile, where we sold the motorcycles, about 3500 miles. All our expenses are included in the overview in this post. Every penny we have spend together or for personal use are included. We are aware that we might have forgotten to add few expenses during our travel – nobody is perfect. Our budget is 66 USD per day including everything. This post covers two time periods 24th-28th of August and 21st of September and 29th of October 2017.In total we spend 165.07 + 2,789.80 = 2954.87 USD in Ecuador (32 days) and riding through Peru (4 days) and arriving in Santiago de Chile (8 days), which calculates into 67.2 USD per day. We use an app called TOSHL FINANCE (https://toshl.com), which we could customize to our travel expenses. We decided to buy TOSHL PRO for 19.99 USD (https://toshl.com/pricing/) which gives us access to an online account where all the pictures are from. The two left pictures covers the 24th-28th of August and the two pictures to the right covers the 21st of September and 29th of October 2017     To save money we have tried to follow these basic rules (4. edition for Ecuador, through Peru, to Santiago de Chile ending our adventure on the motorcycles) The tent camping! Sorry, we are getting tired of living in our tent. After spending 3 weeks on the Galapagos Islands we were tired. We decided to stay at the beach in the small town Montanita, so we had time to relax and exercise. In Ecuador we used Airbnb.com a lot and pre-booked our stay 4 km south from Montanita and in Guayaquil. In Ecuador we found places on Airbnb.com for 10-12 USD per night. A lot of places on Airbnb have discounts if you stay 7 nights or more, so remember to check that out. We still looked for cheap hotels, love hotels and hostals. Driving through Peru in just 4 days we only slept at cheap love hotels (10-15 USD per night for two persons), the worst room was on the fourth floor without a single window, and I the got two electric shocks when using the electric heated shower! Using www.ioverlander.com to find other travelers recommendations for cheap accommodations or we just stopped and asked for the price. We usually get a private room (2 persons) with shared bathroom, because it is cheaper than having a private room with a bathroom. Some places you can negotiate the price, but don’t push it to far. Then we arrived to Chile and the price for a hotel was twice the price or more. So back to camping in the tent. We just wild camped in the dessert as we drove through the northern part of Chile. Stay with other people for free. This is possible by using www.adv-rider.com and www.couchsurfing.com. We have also made friends during our trip, and have been invited to stay at their place for free. I Quito in Ecuador we were invited to stay for free with Ali and Juan (Juan is a part of the Horizon Unlimited network in Quito – thank you for your hospitality ). This was also the place we stored our motorcycles during our trip to the Galapagos Islands. Cook our own food. It is cheap to eat at the small food stands by the road by it is still cheaper if you cook your own meals. Don’t buy imported groceries they are expensive. Canned food are expensive in Ecuador, so whenever you can cook you own meals from fresh produce, you can save money. When you buy a snack, just buy one and share (do you really need one each?), you never know if it is good, and you can always buy another one after the first one. When you have the opportunity to cook fresh produce the cheapest place to go grocery shopping is at the local markets (Mercado), where you can by pretty much everything. Meat is more expensive, so buy 100-125 grams per person per meal. You can also replace meat with eggs or cheese (the local fresh cheese), which is cheaper. We shopped canned food, oats etc. before leaving Ecuador for the 10 days we drove south to Santiago de Chile. Activities: pick the ones which are the most important for you. We try to explore areas by hiking, which doesn’t cost anything (when entering a National Park, there is an entry fee with few exceptions). Some places you have to hire a guide, when you go hiking. Explore the towns and cities by walking around, and don’t spend money on expensive tours fx segway tours. So after we took our PADI scuba diving certificate, we really want to use it. Scuba diving is expensive, so before going we always research if it is the right season and the right place to go fx at the coast of Ecuador it was the right season to dive with the giant manta ray. It is always important to do your own research first – don’t trust the people who are selling the trip to you, because they want to earn money. Categories for the expensesOverview of how we have spend the 2954.87 USD in Ecuador (32 days) and riding through Peru (4 days) and arriving in Santiago de Chile (8 days), which calculates into 67.2 USD per day. We have used the same categories as we have before. Our expenses have been allocated into 10 categories. The categories are ranked after how much money we spend in each category. Remember we spend 44

Expenses in the Galapagos Islands (23 days of travel)

We travelled in the Galapagos Islands between the 29th of August and the 20th of September 2017. In total we spend 23 days travelling WITHOUT our two motorcycles visiting Isla Santa Cruz, Isla Isabela and Isla San Christobal. All our expenses are included in the overview in this post. Every penny we have spend together or for personal use are included except my (Camilla) birthday present. We are aware that we might have forgotten to add few expenses during our travel – nobody is perfect. We didn’t have a budget on Galapagos, but was still trying to live cheap, and spend money on nature and activities, which we knew would be expensive. In total we spend 5,995.16 USD on Galapagos, which calculates into 260.66 USD per day. We spend 2400 USD on a PADI Open Water and PADI Open Water Advanced course. If you don’t include the diving course, we spend 3,595.16 USD, which calculates into 156,3 USD per day. We use an app called TOSHL FINANCE (https://toshl.com), which we could customize to our travel expenses. We decided to buy TOSHL PRO for 19.99 USD (https://toshl.com/pricing/) which gives us access to an online account where all the pictures are from.   Overview for our stay on the Galapagos – Major expenses for transport, accommodation and activities are marked with red Day 1: Arrived on the 29th of August at Baltra airport from Quito (878 USD for a return ticket for the both of us). Bus to Puerto Ayora (2 USD per person), check in at Galapagos Best Hostel (6 nights for 144 USD found it on Airbnb). Had some drinks in town. Taxi to the airport in Quito 20 USD. At Baltra Airport we paid 20 USD per person in immigration and 100 USD per person for entry fee at Galapagos National Park.Day 2 (30/8): Rented bicycles (12 UDS per bicycle per day) and rode all the way to Chato Ranch, saw giant tortoises and walked through the 400 meter long lava tunnel (free). Dinner at Los Kiosko with friends.Day 3 (31/8): Snorkel tour to Santa Fee (100 USD per person): swam with sea lions and were lucky to see a humpback whale on the way back.Day 4 (1/9): Camilla’s birthday, went shopping for a birthday present, visiting the Darwin Research Center (free) and had all you can eat sushi at Midori with friends.Day 5 (2/9): Rebooked our planetickets (in total 56 USD) and booked PADI diving course (1200 USD per person). Made postcards to family and friends.Day 6 (3/9): Hike to Las Grietas with friends (free + 1 USD per person for boat transfer). Went to Tourtuga bay and rented kayaks (10 USD per person). Saw many turtles and took pictures of stingrays but didn’t see them while snorkeling.Day 7 (4/9): Transport by boat to Isabela (30 USD per persons). Walked to breeding center and saw a few flamingos on our way (free). 4 nights at a hotel including breakfast 180 USD.Day 8 (5/9): Rented bicycles (15 USD per person per day) and rode to “The wall of tears” (free). Lunch with marine Iguanas and took many pictures.Day 9 (6/9): Snorkeling at Las Tuneles (115 USD per person).Day 10 (7/9): Hiking trip to Sierra Negra (35 USD per person).Day 11 (8/9): Tzunami warning in the middle of the night. Flew to San Cristobal (120 USD per person). Camilla did not get sick. Grocery shopping and meeting out host Dario, were we would stay the next 4 days (4 night for 96 USD found it on Airbnb).Day 12 (9/9): Reading all morning for PADI Open Water course. Walking around town (free). Visited the Interpretative Center at San Christobal (free). Watching sealions at playa Mann (free). Meeting up with two travelers (Kathlyn and Domique) exchanging travel information for Columbia and Peru.Day 13 (10/9): Reading all morning for PADI Open Water course. Bicycle (half day 7,5 USD per person) trip to Casa de Tarzan in El Progreso.Day 14 (11/9): Reading all morning for PADI Open Water course. Walking to the beaches north of San Christobal: Playa Mann, Playa Punta Carola and Bahia Tijeretas, we went snorkeling a little bit, because the water was really could (free). Watching sealions at playa Mann (free).Day 15 (12/9): Reading all morning for PADI Open Water course. Boat to Santa Cruz (30 USD per person). 8 nights at Galapagos Best Hostel for 192 USD – negotiated the price with the owner, before we left to Isla Isabela.Day 16 (13/9): Theory (watching videos for the PADI Open Water) and diving in pool.Day 17 (14/9): Diving at Seymour Fonodeadero and Mosqueras.Day 18 (15/9): Day of and we spend it on reading and a small theory class for dive times a different depths.Day 19 (16/9): Diving at Seymour La Punta and El Canal. A small theory class for deep diving.Day 20 (17/9): Diving at Gordon Rocks, deep water diving, A small theory class for navigation underwater.Day 21 (18/9): Diving at Seymour La Punta, Daphne Menor and a training dive with navigation. Dinner: eating empanadas with Karen from England.Day 22 (19/9): Relaxing and walking around Puerto Ayora.Day 23 (20/9): flying back to Quito in the morning. Taxi from the airport to Quito 25 USD. We travelled by boat from Santa Cruz to Isabela and by airplane from Isabela to San Christobal   Trying not to over expend we have tried to follow these basic rules (The Galapagos edition) Travel in the Galapagos in low season. Finding cheaper accommodation on Airbnb. Because it is low season some hostels or hotels put rooms up for sale on Airbnb to rent them out. The room we rented at Galapagos Best Hostel was a private room with private bathroom, king size bed, a refrigerator and a small kitchen. Usually the price is 56 USD per night, but we got it for 24 USD a night. This time we used Airbnb.com a lot. On Isla Isabela we booked a hotel in advanced, but we think that due to low season, we could just have walked around

Expenses in Columbia (31 days of travel)

We travelled in Columbia between the 24th of July and the 23rd of August 2017. In total we spend 31 days travelling on our two motorcycles riding about 1600 miles. All our expenses are included in the overview in this post. Every penny we have spend together or for personal use are included. We are aware that we might have forgotten to add few expenses during our travel – nobody is perfect. Our budget is 66 USD per day including everything. On the 1st of August 2017 we had overspend with 426,68 USD, so in order to keep our budget we had to stay below the 66 USD per day. In total we spend 1,352.96 USD in Columbia, which calculates into 43.64 per day. We use an app called TOSHL FINANCE (https://toshl.com), which we could customize to our travel expenses. We decided to buy TOSHL PRO for 19.99 USD (https://toshl.com/pricing/) which gives us access to an online account where all the pictures are from.     To save money we have tried to follow these basic rules (3. edition for Columbia) Camp in our tent when we felt like it. Sorry, we are getting tired of living in our tent. Through Columbia we decided to stay a little bit longer each place (3-4 nights), so we had time to relax and exercise a little bit more. It worked for me, but Esben still needs more rest, and he didn’t have enough energy to exercise as much as I had. We still looked for cheap hotels, love hotels and hostals. Using www.ioverlander.com to find other travelers recommendations for cheap accommodations or we just stopped and asked for the price. We usually get a private room (2 persons) with shared bathroom, because it is cheaper than having a private room with a bathroom. Some places you can negotiate the price, but don’t push it to far. This time we have also used Airbnb.com and pre-booked our stay in Cartagena and at Life-Break Finca just outside Guatape. A lot of places on Airbnb have discounts if you stay 7 nights or more, so remember to check that out. Stay with other people for free. This is possible by using www.adv-rider.com and www.couchsurfing.com. We have also made friends during our trip, and have been invited to stay at their place for free. This didn’t happened in Columbia. Cook our own food. It is cheap to eat at the small food stands by the road by it is still cheaper if you cook your own meals. There is a few exceptions fx elotes and tamales or if we could find a set lunch menu for 5,000 pesos per person (1,75 USD). Don’t buy imported groceries they are expensive. Canned food are expensive in Columbia, so whenever you can cook you own meals from fresh produce, you can save money. When you buy a snack, just buy one and share (do you really need one each?), you never know if it is good, and you can always buy another one after the first one. When you have the opportunity to cook fresh produce the cheapest place the go grocery shopping is at the local markets (Mercado), where you can by pretty much everything. Meat is more expensive, so buy 100-125 grams per person per meal. You can also replace meat with eggs or cheese (the local fresh cheese), which is cheaper. Activities: pick the ones which are the most important for you. We try to explore areas by hiking, which doesn’t cost anything. Some places you have to hire a guide, when you go hiking. Explore the towns and cities by walking around, and don’t spend money on expensive tours fx segway tours. Categories for the expenses Overview of how we have spend the 1352.96 USD in Columbia. We have used the same categories for Columbia as in Central America and Mexico. Our expenses have been allocated into 10 categories not using the category “Camping” which includes camping equipment and camping repairs. I also put in the overview for Central America and Mexico to compare how the categories are ranked after how much money we spend in each category. Remember we spend 89 days in Mexico, 49 days in Central America and 31 days in Columbia. What springs to my mind is that we only used 2.99 USD on our motorcycles, because the motorcycles didn’t needed any spare parts or oil change through Columbia. We Spend 16.3 USD on food per day in Columbia, which was only 11.9 USD in Central America, I think it was because the canned food was more expensive. We spend a lot less on activities, because in Columbia it was easier to do hiking on you own and we didn’t do any multiday tours. From the left Columbia (43.64 USD), Central America (59,56 USD per day) and to the right Mexico (49,72 USD per day)     All the categories have subcategories (called Tags), which makes it possible for us to get a more detailed overview of the expenses within the different categories. In the top each picture you have the total amount of expenses in the category, and underneath you have the amount of expenses allocated into the subcategories. Remember that you can compare the expenses in Columbia with Central America and Mexico.             In total we are satisfied of how we spend our money in Columbia. Maybe we could have saved a little bit on food, but we don’t think that it would have been a lot. It is all about keeping track for your expenses so you don’t overspend and spend money on the things that are important to you.